KAIROS

448-project-title-dash

Tangible Product, 10 weeks

YOUR AUDIO GUIDED JOURNALING COMPANION THROUGH GRIEF

MY ROLE

MY ROLE

MY ROLE

MY ROLE

438 short dash

Research
Concept Development
Prototyping
Videography

Research
Concept Development
Prototyping
Videography

Research
Concept Development
Prototyping
Videography

Research
Concept Development
Prototyping
Videography

TOOLS

TOOLS

TOOLS

TOOLS

438 short dash

Adobe Illustrator
Adobe Premiere Pro
Arduino
Makey Makey
Sketch 

Adobe Illustrator
Adobe Premiere Pro
Arduino
Makey Makey
Sketch 

Adobe Illustrator
Adobe Premiere Pro
Arduino
Makey Makey
Sketch 

Adobe Illustrator
Adobe Premiere Pro
Arduino
Makey Makey
Sketch 

WHAT IS KAIROS ?

WHAT IS KAIROS ?

WHAT IS KAIROS ?

WHAT IS KAIROS ?

KAIROS is an audio guided journaling companion that provides a safe space for the bereaved to express and explore their grief through writing. Supporting each in their own time, it's designed to bring a haven of calm into their hearts as they move forward in grief.

KAIROS is an audio guided journaling companion that provides a safe space for the bereaved to express and explore their grief through writing. Supporting each in their own time, it's designed to bring a haven of calm into their hearts as they move forward in grief.

KAIROS is an audio guided journaling companion that provides a safe space for the bereaved to express and explore their grief through writing. Supporting each in their own time, it's designed to bring a haven of calm into their hearts as they move forward in grief.

KAIROS is an audio guided journaling companion that provides a safe space for the bereaved to express and explore their grief through writing. Supporting each in their own time, it's designed to bring a haven of calm into their hearts as they move forward in grief.

User Journey

WHY GRIEF ?

WHY GRIEF ?

WHY GRIEF ?

I was inspired to explore the subject of grief after losing someone very dear to me. It left me wondering whether enough has been done to support those who've experienced such a life changing event. I also wanted to challenge myself to explore what I feared - the intangible. How could we design for such intense emotions that we all go through simply because we’re human? 

It’s equally important to you too because while grief is so personal, it's also very universal. I’ve focused on the loss of a loved one through death in this project, but I see grief as the emotions that one goes through following any form of loss. We’ll all go through it sooner or later, one way or another. There’s simply no escaping from it.  

I was inspired to explore the subject of grief after losing someone very dear to me. It left me wondering whether enough has been done to support those who've experienced such a life changing event. I also wanted to challenge myself to explore what I feared - the intangible. How could we design for such intense emotions that we all go through simply because we’re human? 

It’s equally important to you too because while grief is so personal, it's also very universal. I’ve focused on the loss of a loved one through death in this project, but I see grief as the emotions that one goes through following any form of loss. We’ll all go through it sooner or later, one way or another. There’s simply no escaping from it.  

I was inspired to explore the subject of grief after losing someone very dear to me. It left me wondering whether enough has been done to support those who've experienced such a life changing event. I also wanted to challenge myself to explore what I feared - the intangible. How could we design for such intense emotions that we all go through simply because we’re human? 

It’s equally important to you too because while grief is so personal, it's also very universal. I’ve focused on the loss of a loved one through death in this project, but I see grief as the emotions that one goes through following any form of loss. We’ll all go through it sooner or later, one way or another. There’s simply no escaping from it.  

I was inspired to explore the subject of grief after losing someone very dear to me. It left me wondering whether enough has been done to support those who've experienced such a life changing event. I also wanted to challenge myself to explore what I feared - the intangible. How could we design for such intense emotions that we all go through simply because we’re human? 

It’s equally important to you too because while grief is so personal, it's also very universal. I’ve focused on the loss of a loved one through death in this project, but I see grief as the emotions that one goes through following any form of loss. We’ll all go through it sooner or later, one way or another. There’s simply no escaping from it.  

WHAT'S THE GRIEF JOURNEY LIKE ?

WHAT'S THE GRIEF JOURNEY LIKE ?

WHAT'S THE GRIEF JOURNEY LIKE ?

WHAT'S THE GRIEF JOURNEY LIKE ?

I learned from speaking with grief therapists that the five stages of grief coined by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross is actually a popular myth that people associate with when they think of grief. Many mistakenly assume that the grieving process is linear and comes in five stages. In fact, Kübler-Ross actually developed this model to describe the process that patients go through as they come to terms with their own terminal illnesses.

In reality, the journey of grief looks a lot more like the below. This graph shows an overlap of emotional seismographs the bereaved had drawn. The process is clearly not linear but full of highs and lows. 

I learned from speaking with grief therapists that the five stages of grief coined by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross is actually a popular myth that people associate with when they think of grief. Many mistakenly assume that the grieving process is linear and comes in five stages. In fact, Kübler-Ross actually developed this model to describe the process that patients go through as they come to terms with their own terminal illnesses.

In reality, the journey of grief looks a lot more like the below. This graph shows an overlap of emotional seismographs the bereaved had drawn. The process is clearly not linear but full of highs and lows. 

I learned from speaking with grief therapists that the five stages of grief coined by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross is actually a popular myth that people associate with when they think of grief. Many mistakenly assume that the grieving process is linear and comes in five stages. In fact, Kübler-Ross actually developed this model to describe the process that patients go through as they come to terms with their own terminal illnesses.

In reality, the journey of grief looks a lot more like the below. This graph shows an overlap of emotional seismographs the bereaved had drawn. The process is clearly not linear but full of highs and lows. 

I learned from speaking with grief therapists that the five stages of grief coined by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross is actually a popular myth that people associate with when they think of grief. Many mistakenly assume that the grieving process is linear and comes in five stages. In fact, Kübler-Ross actually developed this model to describe the process that patients go through as they come to terms with their own terminal illnesses.

In reality, the journey of grief looks a lot more like the below. This graph shows an overlap of emotional seismographs the bereaved had drawn. The process is clearly not linear but full of highs and lows. 

Expectations vs Reality2

WHERE'S THE DESIGN OPPORTUNITY ?

WHERE'S THE DESIGN OPPORTUNITY ?

WHERE'S THE DESIGN OPPORTUNITY ?

WHERE'S THE DESIGN OPPORTUNITY ?

the lack of support as time goes on

The “aha” moment for me was learning that there’s a dip that kicks in as time goes by. There's almost an expectation from society that people would get over it after some time has passed. And so, while the bereaved may be busy early on with say after-death arrangements, as soon as there’s time to tend to their emotions, that’s when they don’t end up getting the support that they need.

Support is often lacking from their close circles, but also when they reach out to professionals. It's not that friends and family wouldn't like to help, but many are unsure of what to say or are afraid to say the wrong things. The waiting time to meet with a professional can also be long (as long as one and a half years). Accordingly, not many bereaved end up having the conversations they wish they'd had or need. This gap only grows bigger as time goes on. 

the lack of support as time goes on

The “aha” moment for me was learning that there’s a dip that kicks in as time goes by. There's almost an expectation from society that people would get over it after some time has passed. And so, while the bereaved may be busy early on with say after-death arrangements, as soon as there’s time to tend to their emotions, that’s when they don’t end up getting the support that they need.

Support is often lacking from their close circles, but also when they reach out to professionals. It's not that friends and family wouldn't like to help, but many are unsure of what to say or are afraid to say the wrong things. The waiting time to meet with a professional can also be long (as long as one and a half years). Accordingly, not many bereaved end up having the conversations they wish they'd had or need. This gap only grows bigger as time goes on. 

the lack of support as time goes on

The “aha” moment for me was learning that there’s a dip that kicks in as time goes by. There's almost an expectation from society that people would get over it after some time has passed. And so, while the bereaved may be busy early on with say after-death arrangements, as soon as there’s time to tend to their emotions, that’s when they don’t end up getting the support that they need.

Support is often lacking from their close circles, but also when they reach out to professionals. It's not that friends and family wouldn't like to help, but many are unsure of what to say or are afraid to say the wrong things. The waiting time to meet with a professional can also be long (as long as one and a half years). Accordingly, not many bereaved end up having the conversations they wish they'd had or need. This gap only grows bigger as time goes on. 

the lack of support as time goes on

The “aha” moment for me was learning that there’s a dip that kicks in as time goes by. There's almost an expectation from society that people would get over it after some time has passed. And so, while the bereaved may be busy early on with say after-death arrangements, as soon as there’s time to tend to their emotions, that’s when they don’t end up getting the support that they need.

Support is often lacking from their close circles, but also when they reach out to professionals. It's not that friends and family wouldn't like to help, but many are unsure of what to say or are afraid to say the wrong things. The waiting time to meet with a professional can also be long (as long as one and a half years). Accordingly, not many bereaved end up having the conversations they wish they'd had or need. This gap only grows bigger as time goes on. 

WHAT'S THE VALUE ?

WHAT'S THE VALUE ?

WHAT'S THE VALUE ?

It's incredible how something as simple as a candleholder can put people into an emotional space to unpack their emotions, and with this object as an anchor, transform the feeling of the physical space. 

KAIROS makes it easier to create that space to grieve, which can be especially difficult when feeling overwhelmed with emotions.

Whilst writing is not the only way to support the grieving and KAIROS cannot replace human interactions, perhaps it could still offer a way for the bereaved to find peace by looking inwards when support is difficult to get hold of. 

 It's incredible how something as simple as a candleholder can put people into an emotional space to unpack their emotions, and with this object as an anchor, transform the feeling of the physical space. 

KAIROS makes it easier to create that space to grieve, which can be especially difficult when feeling overwhelmed with emotions.

Whilst writing is not the only way to support the grieving and KAIROS cannot replace human interactions, perhaps it could still offer a way for the bereaved to find peace by looking inwards when support is difficult to get hold of. 

 It's incredible how something as simple as a candleholder can put people into an emotional space to unpack their emotions, and with this object as an anchor, transform the feeling of the physical space. 

KAIROS makes it easier to create that space to grieve, which can be especially difficult when feeling overwhelmed with emotions.

Whilst writing is not the only way to support the grieving and KAIROS cannot replace human interactions, perhaps it could still offer a way for the bereaved to find peace by looking inwards when support is difficult to get hold of. 

 It's incredible how something as simple as a candleholder can put people into an emotional space to unpack their emotions, and with this object as an anchor, transform the feeling of the physical space. 

KAIROS makes it easier to create that space to grieve, which can be especially difficult when feeling overwhelmed with emotions.

Whilst writing is not the only way to support the grieving and KAIROS cannot replace human interactions, perhaps it could still offer a way for the bereaved to find peace by looking inwards when support is difficult to get hold of. 

What people have said about KAIROS

What people have said about KAIROS

What people have said about KAIROS

PROCESS: RESEARCH

PROCESS: RESEARCH

PROCESS: RESEARCH

Immersing myself in my immediate surroundings, I visited museums and exhibitions, read books and academic articles (see list of references here). Given lengthy recruitment time, I also spoke with as many people as I could and conducted numerous analogous interviews (e.g., those who lost pets). 

I'm grateful to have interviewed 12 bereaved adults, 11 of whom were involved in the co-creation process and eight people stayed with me till the end. 

The most challenging part was managing the emotions and to watch my use of language. I learned to go according to each interviewee's pace, balancing research without compromising their emotions.

Immersing myself in my immediate surroundings, I visited museums and exhibitions, read books and academic articles (see list of references here). Given lengthy recruitment time, I also spoke with as many people as I could and conducted numerous analogous interviews (e.g., those who lost pets). 

I'm grateful to have interviewed 12 bereaved adults, 11 of whom were involved in the co-creation process and eight people stayed with me till the end. 

The most challenging part was managing the emotions and to watch my use of language. I learned to go according to each interviewee's pace, balancing research without compromising their emotions.

Immersing myself in my immediate surroundings, I visited museums and exhibitions, read books and academic articles (see list of references here). Given lengthy recruitment time, I also spoke with as many people as I could and conducted numerous analogous interviews (e.g., those who lost pets). 

I'm grateful to have interviewed 12 bereaved adults, 11 of whom were involved in the co-creation process and eight people stayed with me till the end. 

The most challenging part was managing the emotions and to watch my use of language. I learned to go according to each interviewee's pace, balancing research without compromising their emotions.

Immersing myself in my immediate surroundings, I visited museums and exhibitions, read books and academic articles (see list of references here). Given lengthy recruitment time, I also spoke with as many people as I could and conducted numerous analogous interviews (e.g., those who lost pets). 

I'm grateful to have interviewed 12 bereaved adults, 11 of whom were involved in the co-creation process and eight people stayed with me till the end. 

The most challenging part was managing the emotions and to watch my use of language. I learned to go according to each interviewee's pace, balancing research without compromising their emotions.

Research

PROCESS: IDEATION

PROCESS: IDEATION

PROCESS: IDEATION

PROCESS: IDEATION

Based on early insights from initial conversations, I came up with two opportunity statements. This led to the development of two initial concepts to explore some of the questions I had (namely, were there other ways of coping besides talking and writing? what were the differences between public and private rituals? any preferences?). 

Based on early insights from initial conversations, I came up with two opportunity statements. This led to the development of two initial concepts to explore some of the questions I had (namely, were there other ways of coping besides talking and writing? what were the differences between public and private rituals? any preferences?). 

Based on early insights from initial conversations, I came up with two opportunity statements. This led to the development of two initial concepts to explore some of the questions I had (namely, were there other ways of coping besides talking and writing? what were the differences between public and private rituals? any preferences?). 

Based on early insights from initial conversations, I came up with two opportunity statements. This led to the development of two initial concepts to explore some of the questions I had (namely, were there other ways of coping besides talking and writing? what were the differences between public and private rituals? any preferences?). 

Insights Ideation (mosaic)

Early insights from initial conversations

Early insights from initial conversations

Early insights from initial conversations

KEY INSIGHTS

KEY INSIGHTS

KEY INSIGHTS

Insights (trimmed)

EXPLORATIONS & PROTOTYPING

EXPLORATIONS & PROTOTYPING

EXPLORATIONS & PROTOTYPING

EXPLORATIONS & PROTOTYPING

The fact that writing was mentioned in almost every interview, I decided to look into journaling. My question evolved to how could we reimagine the journaling experience? After researching the existing market for journaling, I embarked on the following three explorations: 

The fact that writing was mentioned in almost every interview, I decided to look into journaling. My question evolved to how could we reimagine the journaling experience? After researching the existing market for journaling, I embarked on the following three explorations: 

The fact that writing was mentioned in almost every interview, I decided to look into journaling. My question evolved to how could we reimagine the journaling experience? After researching the existing market for journaling, I embarked on the following three explorations: 

The fact that writing was mentioned in almost every interview, I decided to look into journaling. My question evolved to how could we reimagine the journaling experience? After researching the existing market for journaling, I embarked on the following three explorations: 

Audio Recording

Me recording an audio journaling prompt 

EXPLORATION #1:
AUDIO JOURNALING PROMPT

EXPLORATION #1: AUDIO JOURNALING PROMPT

EXPLORATION #1: AUDIO JOURNALING PROMPT

Inspired by the meditation app, headspace, I created an audio journaling prompt recording myself speaking out the prompt and tested with the bereaved by sending them the audio clip.

I learned that all of them loved the human aspect of having a human voice guide them to write.

Inspired by the meditation app, headspace, I created an audio journaling prompt recording myself speaking out the prompt and tested with the bereaved by sending them the audio clip.

I learned that all of them loved the human aspect of having a human voice guide them to write.

Inspired by the meditation app, headspace, I created an audio journaling prompt recording myself speaking out the prompt and tested with the bereaved by sending them the audio clip. I learned that all of them loved the human aspect of having a human voice guide them to write.

Inspired by the meditation app, headspace, I created an audio journaling prompt recording myself speaking out the prompt and tested with the bereaved by sending them the audio clip. I learned that all of them loved the human aspect of having a human voice guide them to write.

EXPLORATION #2:
VISUAL JOURNALING PROMPT

EXPLORATION #2: VISUAL JOURNALING PROMPT

EXPLORATION #2: VISUAL JOURNALING PROMPT

I looked at having a visual journaling prompt (like traditionally) but through different screens.

Ultimately, I learned that this may not be most desirable. A screen takes away the human element. For the bereaved, the focus seemed to rest on making the experience more human.

I looked at having a visual journaling prompt (like traditionally) but through different screens.

Ultimately, I learned that this may not be most desirable. A screen takes away the human element. For the bereaved, the focus seemed to rest on making the experience more human.

I looked at having a visual journaling prompt (like traditionally) but through different screens. Ultimately, I learned that this may not be most desirable. A screen takes away the human element. For the bereaved, the focus seemed to rest on making the experience more human.

I looked at having a visual journaling prompt (like traditionally) but through different screens. Ultimately, I learned that this may not be most desirable. A screen takes away the human element. For the bereaved, the focus seemed to rest on making the experience more human.

IMG_8450

Prototyping concepts for visual journaling

voice journaling-3

Prototyping key screens for voice journaling

Prototyping key screens for voice journaling

Prototyping key screens for voice journaling

EXPLORATION #3:
VOICE JOURNALING

EXPLORATION #3: VOICE JOURNALING

EXPLORATION #3: VOICE JOURNALING

Voice journaling was explored following conversations with the bereaved. Indeed some of them have the habit of talking out loud to their lost ones, but I quickly learned that it can be weird to talk to an object when in the context of journaling.

Voice journaling was explored following conversations with the bereaved. Indeed some of them have the habit of talking out loud to their lost ones, but I quickly learned that it can be weird to talk to an object when in the context of journaling.

Voice journaling was explored following conversations with the bereaved. Indeed some of them have the habit of talking out loud to their lost ones, but I quickly learned that it can be weird to talk to an object when in the context of journaling.

Voice journaling was explored following conversations with the bereaved. Indeed some of them have the habit of talking out loud to their lost ones, but I quickly learned that it can be weird to talk to an object when in the context of journaling.

TESTING

TESTING

TESTING

I took KAIROS to 8 bereaved, some in person and some over video calls. All were sent the audio journaling guide, followed by a discussion for their feedback.

3 out of 8 bereaved engaged in experience prototyping where I used role playing and wizard-of-oz methods to test how they interact with the prototypes. I made iterations to the concept based on the feedback received.

I took KAIROS to 8 bereaved, some in person and some over video calls. All were sent the audio journaling guide, followed by a discussion for their feedback.

3 out of 8 bereaved engaged in experience prototyping where I used role playing and wizard-of-oz methods to test how they interact with the prototypes. I made iterations to the concept based on the feedback received.

I took KAIROS to 8 bereaved, some in person and some over video calls. All were sent the audio journaling guide, followed by a discussion for their feedback.

3 out of 8 bereaved engaged in experience prototyping where I used role playing and wizard-of-oz methods to test how they interact with the prototypes. I made iterations to the concept based on the feedback received.

I took KAIROS to 8 bereaved, some in person and some over video calls. All were sent the audio journaling guide, followed by a discussion for their feedback.

3 out of 8 bereaved engaged in experience prototyping where I used role playing and wizard-of-oz methods to test how they interact with the prototypes. I made iterations to the concept based on the feedback received.

Testing YD

Demo of KAIROS to the grief therapist

Showing a demo of KAIROS to the grief therapist

Showing a demo of KAIROS to the grief therapist

matches marie

Testing choice between matches & lighter 

Testing their preferences between matches & lighter 

Testing their preferences between matches & lighter 

wizard-of-oz-m

Conducting wizard-of-oz prototyping

Conducting wizard-of-oz prototyping

Conducting wizard-of-oz prototyping

EXHIBITING KAIROS

EXHIBITING KAIROS

EXHIBITING KAIROS

EXHIBITING KAIROS

Exhibition Collage

Visitors' experiencing Kairos at the exhibition in December 2019

Visitors' experiencing Kairos at the exhibition in December 2019

Visitors' experiencing Kairos at the exhibition in December 2019

IMG_0563
IMG_0565-2
IMG_0564
IMG_0562-2

Thoughts from exhibition visitors, including some who began journaling

LEARNINGS

LEARNINGS

LEARNINGS

 
building rapport & trust takes time, but it's worth it

To let your interviewees feel comfortable so they can be honest with what they’re sharing. Despite documentation being important, I made it a priority to care for their feelings, to be transparent and accommodating every step of the way. I'm grateful to have developed many new friendships as a result. 

learning to be vulnerable

During the process, I also learned to be comfortable to share a part of me that’s deeply personal. I prepared a short booklet introducing myself before meeting each interviewee as I find it to be a two way street: for them to learn about me and understand why I’m interested in speaking with them. This mindset also meant embracing the uncertainties along the way and to be vulnerable to trust, and to let the bereaved guide me through my process. As a designer, it was a great opportunity to be vulnerable with the people I design for.

 
building rapport & trust takes time, but it's worth it

To let your interviewees feel comfortable so they can be honest with what they’re sharing. Despite documentation being important, I made it a priority to care for their feelings, to be transparent and accommodating every step of the way. I'm grateful to have developed many new friendships as a result. 

learning to be vulnerable

During the process, I also learned to be comfortable to share a part of me that’s deeply personal. I prepared a short booklet introducing myself before meeting each interviewee as I find it to be a two way street: for them to learn about me and understand why I’m interested in speaking with them. This mindset also meant embracing the uncertainties along the way and to be vulnerable to trust, and to let the bereaved guide me through my process. As a designer, it was a great opportunity to be vulnerable with the people I design for.

 
building rapport & trust takes time, but it's worth it

To let your interviewees feel comfortable so they can be honest with what they’re sharing. Despite documentation being important, I made it a priority to care for their feelings, to be transparent and accommodating every step of the way. I'm grateful to have developed many new friendships as a result. 

learning to be vulnerable

During the process, I also learned to be comfortable to share a part of me that’s deeply personal. I prepared a short booklet introducing myself before meeting each interviewee as I find it to be a two way street: for them to learn about me and understand why I’m interested in speaking with them. This mindset also meant embracing the uncertainties along the way and to be vulnerable to trust, and to let the bereaved guide me through my process. As a designer, it was a great opportunity to be vulnerable with the people I design for.


building rapport & trust takes time, but it's worth it

To let your interviewees feel comfortable so they can be honest with what they’re sharing. Despite documentation being important, I made it a priority to care for their feelings, to be transparent and accommodating every step of the way. I'm grateful to have developed many new friendships as a result. 

learning to be vulnerable

During the process, I also learned to be comfortable to share a part of me that’s deeply personal. I prepared a short booklet introducing myself before meeting each interviewee as I find it to be a two way street: for them to learn about me and understand why I’m interested in speaking with them. This mindset also meant embracing the uncertainties along the way and to be vulnerable to trust, and to let the bereaved guide me through my process. As a designer, it was a great opportunity to be vulnerable with the people I design for.


building rapport & trust takes time, but it's worth it

To let your interviewees feel comfortable so they can be honest with what they’re sharing. Despite documentation being important, I made it a priority to care for their feelings, to be transparent and accommodating every step of the way. I'm grateful to have developed many new friendships as a result. 

learning to be vulnerable

During the process, I also learned to be comfortable to share a part of me that’s deeply personal. I prepared a short booklet introducing myself before meeting each interviewee as I find it to be a two way street: for them to learn about me and understand why I’m interested in speaking with them. This mindset also meant embracing the uncertainties along the way and to be vulnerable to trust, and to let the bereaved guide me through my process. As a designer, it was a great opportunity to be vulnerable with the people I design for.

KAIROS was developed over ten weeks as my final project at the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design. This is also an ongoing project I'm exploring with some of stakeholders involved in my design process. Do reach out if you're interested in collaborating with us or have any ideas or suggestions!

I owe my thanks to: Bethany Snyder, Finn, David Beaulieu, Adrian Westaway, Andreas Refsgaard, Arunima Singh, Can Yanardag, Clara Gaggero Westaway, Fahmida Azad, Simona Maschi, Ulrik Hogrebe, Aditi Vijay, Alin Ionas
, Anthony Lau, April Chan, Bernina Chan, Bianca Chan, Christina Li, Christel Wolff, Felix Yau, Marcelo Pineda, Marie Brittain, Mette Lauesen, Mohammad Elhariry, Pauline Vandet, Peter Wong, Xena Gunawan, Yithza Davelaar & CIID IDP 2019 (special shoutouts to Aakash, Joey, Joseph, Léa, Mitsu, PJ & Yang).
 

KAIROS was developed over ten weeks as my final project at the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design. This is also an ongoing project I'm exploring with some of stakeholders involved in my design process. Do reach out if you're interested in collaborating with us or have any ideas or suggestions!

I owe my thanks to: Bethany Snyder, Finn, David Beaulieu, Adrian Westaway, Andreas Refsgaard, Arunima Singh, Can Yanardag, Clara Gaggero Westaway, Fahmida Azad, Simona Maschi, Ulrik Hogrebe, Aditi Vijay, Alin Ionas
, Anthony Lau, April Chan, Bernina Chan, Bianca Chan, Christina Li, Christel Wolff, Felix Yau, Marcelo Pineda, Marie Brittain, Mette Lauesen, Mohammad Elhariry, Pauline Vandet, Peter Wong, Xena Gunawan, Yithza Davelaar & CIID IDP 2019 (special shoutouts to Aakash, Joey, Joseph, Léa, Mitsu, PJ & Yang).
 

KAIROS was developed over ten weeks as my final project at the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design. This is also an ongoing project I'm exploring with some of stakeholders involved in my design process. Do reach out if you're interested in collaborating with us or have any ideas or suggestions!

I owe my thanks to: Bethany Snyder, Finn, David Beaulieu, Adrian Westaway, Andreas Refsgaard, Arunima Singh, Can Yanardag, Clara Gaggero Westaway, Fahmida Azad, Simona Maschi, Ulrik Hogrebe, Aditi Vijay, Alin Ionas, Anthony Lau, April Chan, Bernina Chan, Bianca Chan, Christina Li, Christel Wolff, Felix Yau, Marcelo Pineda, Marie Brittain, Mette Lauesen, Mohammad Elhariry, Pauline Vandet, Peter Wong, Xena Gunawan, Yithza Davelaar & CIID IDP 2019 (special shoutouts to Aakash, Joey, Joseph, Léa, Mitsu, PJ & Yang).
 

KAIROS was developed over ten weeks as my final project at the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design. This is also an ongoing project I'm exploring with some of stakeholders involved in my design process. Do reach out if you're interested in collaborating with us or have any ideas or suggestions!

I owe my thanks to: Bethany Snyder, Finn, David Beaulieu, Adrian Westaway, Andreas Refsgaard, Arunima Singh, Can Yanardag, Clara Gaggero Westaway, Fahmida Azad, Simona Maschi, Ulrik Hogrebe, Aditi Vijay, Alin Ionas, Anthony Lau, April Chan, Bernina Chan, Bianca Chan, Christina Li, Christel Wolff, Felix Yau, Marcelo Pineda, Marie Brittain, Mette Lauesen, Mohammad Elhariry, Pauline Vandet, Peter Wong, Xena Gunawan, Yithza Davelaar & CIID IDP 2019 (special shoutouts to Aakash, Joey, Joseph, Léa, Mitsu, PJ & Yang).
 

Creative Commons License.