I, DRAWING ROBOT

448-project-title-dash

Physical Computing, 1 week

VISUAL EXPRESSION THROUGH EYE MOVEMENT

Our experience empowers those with motor disabilities to express their vision on canvas. At the end of the experience, participants can take home their unique drawing capturing a one-of-a-kind experience.

The OpenCV library was used in Processing to track eye movements, which were then mapped to cardinal directions within a Processing sketch. To interpret these directional instructions, signals are sent from Processing to two Arduinos, one to control the LEDs, another to ‘steer’ the drawing robot on canvas, creating abstract patterns.

Research
Concept Development
Systems Design
Video Editing

Research
Concept Development
Systems Design
Video Editing

Research
Concept Development
Systems Design
Video Editing

MY ROLE

MY ROLE

MY ROLE

MY ROLE

438 short dash

Concept Development
Prototyping
Videography

Research
Concept Development
Systems Design
Video Editing

Research
Concept Development
Systems Design
Video Editing

Research
Concept Development
Systems Design
Video Editing

TOOLS

TOOLS

TOOLS

TOOLS

438 short dash

Adobe Illustrator
Adobe Premiere Pro
Arduino
Fusion360
Processing

Adobe Photoshop
Adobe Premiere Pro
Arduino
Rihnocerous 3D

Adobe Photoshop
Adobe Premiere Pro
Arduino
Rihnocerous 3D

Adobe Photoshop
Adobe Premiere Pro
Arduino
Rihnocerous 3D

BRIEF

BRIEF

BRIEF

BRIEF

"Create a drawing machine that does not use a screen as means of expression and feedback."

"Create a drawing machine that does not use a screen as means of expression and feedback."

"Create a drawing machine that does not use a screen as means of expression and feedback."

"Create a drawing machine that does not use a screen as means of expression and feedback."

PROCESS

PROCESS

PROCESS

PROCESS

The design process involved concept development and rapid prototyping. Before developing a concept, we asked ourselves the question: who might use a drawing machine and why. Originally conceived as a serious tool to help those with severe motor handicaps to express themselves, this project bloomed into a greater, more inclusive experience that could serve a more general purpose, while not compromising on usability for its initial target group.

Regular feedback and iteration were crucial to the rapid prototyping phase. Based on previous learnings, we tested our ideas early on, both in terms of concept and feasibility (e.g., locating software that would help with eye tracking and exploring ways to convert eye tracking into drawing). We also coded and fabricated in parallel to optimize workflow. With user testing, our team discovered that users needed to know what their eye movement translated to without looking at the robot. This led us to develop the feedback lights.

The design process involved concept development and rapid prototyping. Before developing a concept, we asked ourselves the question: who might use a drawing machine and why. Originally conceived as a serious tool to help those with severe motor handicaps to express themselves, this project bloomed into a greater, more inclusive experience that could serve a more general purpose, while not compromising on usability for its initial target group.

Regular feedback and iteration were crucial to the rapid prototyping phase. Based on previous learnings, we tested our ideas early on, both in terms of concept and feasibility (e.g., locating software that would help with eye tracking and exploring ways to convert eye tracking into drawing). We also coded and fabricated in parallel to optimize workflow. With user testing, our team discovered that users needed to know what their eye movement translated to without looking at the robot. This led us to develop the feedback lights.

The design process involved concept development and rapid prototyping. Before developing a concept, we asked ourselves the question: who might use a drawing machine and why. Originally conceived as a serious tool to help those with severe motor handicaps to express themselves, this project bloomed into a greater, more inclusive experience that could serve a more general purpose, while not compromising on usability for its initial target group.

Regular feedback and iteration were crucial to the rapid prototyping phase. Based on previous learnings, we tested our ideas early on, both in terms of concept and feasibility (e.g., locating software that would help with eye tracking and exploring ways to convert eye tracking into drawing). We also coded and fabricated in parallel to optimize workflow. With user testing, our team discovered that users needed to know what their eye movement translated to without looking at the robot. This led us to develop the feedback lights.

The design process involved concept development and rapid prototyping. Before developing a concept, we asked ourselves the question: who might use a drawing machine and why. Originally conceived as a serious tool to help those with severe motor handicaps to express themselves, this project bloomed into a greater, more inclusive experience that could serve a more general purpose, while not compromising on usability for its initial target group.

Regular feedback and iteration were crucial to the rapid prototyping phase. Based on previous learnings, we tested our ideas early on, both in terms of concept and feasibility (e.g., locating software that would help with eye tracking and exploring ways to convert eye tracking into drawing). We also coded and fabricated in parallel to optimize workflow. With user testing, our team discovered that users needed to know what their eye movement translated to without looking at the robot. This led us to develop the feedback lights.

IMG_9196

Low fidelity prototype of the drawing robot

Team brainstorming on opportunity areas

Low fidelity prototype of the drawing robot

IMG_9292

Prototyping the user experience

Team brainstorming on opportunity areas

Prototyping the user experience

IMG_9280-2

Initial sketches of the experience set up

Team brainstorming on opportunity areas

Initial sketches of the experience set up

Testing movements on the initial prototype

Interview to better understand people's charging habits

Testing movements on the initial prototype

3D printing the drawing robot

Interview to better understand people's charging habits

3D printing the drawing robot

5971238282396801453_IMG_0171

Testing the eye tracking feature on Processing

Interview to better understand people's charging habits

Testing the eye tracking feature on Processing

666801104216380912_IMG_02192

LEARNINGS

LEARNINGS

LEARNINGS

LEARNINGS

LEARNINGS

 
work in parallel

As a team, we learned to test our ideas early on and to prototype and code in parallel. We regrouped often during the day to maintain effective communication. This arrangement helped us achieve a lot more with less time.  

live communication between arduino & processing

In learning that Processing communicates at a much faster rate than the robot would respond, we calibrated the time it took for Processing to relay messages to the Arduino. This creates an instant feedback between the user’s eye movement and the robot’s drawing.

 
work in parallel

As a team, we learned to test our ideas early on and to prototype and code in parallel. We regrouped often during the day to maintain effective communication. This arrangement helped us achieve a lot more with less time.  

live communication between arduino & processing

In learning that Processing communicates at a much faster rate than the robot would respond, we calibrated the time it took for Processing to relay messages to the Arduino. This creates an instant feedback between the user’s eye movement and the robot’s drawing.

 
work in parallel

As a team, we learned to test our ideas early on and to prototype and code in parallel. We regrouped often during the day to maintain effective communication. This arrangement helped us achieve a lot more with less time.  

live communication between arduino & processing

In learning that Processing communicates at a much faster rate than the robot would respond, we calibrated the time it took for Processing to relay messages to the Arduino. This creates an instant feedback between the user’s eye movement and the robot’s drawing.

 
work in parallel

As a team, we learned to test our ideas early on and to prototype and code in parallel. We regrouped often during the day to maintain effective communication. This arrangement helped us achieve a lot more with less time.  

live communication between arduino & processing

In learning that Processing communicates at a much faster rate than the robot would respond, we calibrated the time it took for Processing to relay messages to the Arduino. This creates an instant feedback between the user’s eye movement and the robot’s drawing.

 
work in parallel

As a team, we learned to test our ideas early on and to prototype and code in parallel. We regrouped often during the day to maintain effective communication. This arrangement helped us achieve a lot more with less time.  

live communication between arduino & processing

In learning that Processing communicates at a much faster rate than the robot would respond, we calibrated the time it took for Processing to relay messages to the Arduino. This creates an instant feedback between the user’s eye movement and the robot’s drawing.

I, DRAWING ROBOT was developed together with and Davi Magalhães (Graphic Designer) and Gaana Srinvas (Digital Product Designer) during the Physical Computing course at the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design taught by Dario Buzzini & David Sjunnesson
 

I, DRAWING ROBOT was developed together with and Davi Magalhães (Graphic Designer) and Gaana Srinvas (Digital Product Designer) during the Physical Computing course at the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design taught by Dario Buzzini & David Sjunnesson
 

I, DRAWING ROBOT was developed together with and Davi Magalhães (Graphic Designer) and Gaana Srinvas (Digital Product Designer) during the Physical Computing course at the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design taught by Dario Buzzini & David Sjunnesson
 

I, DRAWING ROBOT was developed together with and Davi Magalhães (Graphic Designer) and Gaana Srinvas (Digital Product Designer) during the Physical Computing course at the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design taught by Dario Buzzini & David Sjunnesson
 

© 2024 FEI KWOK